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Watch Online As for the future of the franchise mid-credits sequence suggest that Dom, Hobbs and the rest aren’t going anywhere, which wouldn’t be the worst thing in the world.A Manila premiere that brought Vin Diesel, Michelle Rodriguez, Gina Carano, and Luke Evans (as well as select foreign press) here had everyone hyped—and much deservedly so. This was Manila’s first big Hollywood franchise that cared enough to bring in four of its film’s stars. Accordingly, Fast & Furious, the fourth film in the series and the second to be directed by Lin, was treated as a fresh start. It reunited Diesel and Walker

watch now hereFast And Furious 6Movie Download and moved the story back to California, also dipping over the border into Mexico. The film made $155 million in the States and $208 million overseas, $33 million of which came from Mexico, Central and South America. If blockbusters began in 1915 with The Birth of a Nation, then we are fast approaching the genre’s centenary. The intervening 100 years have brought so many innovations – sound, colour, digital, 3D – that it’s worth taking a moment to marvel at the three things that have remained almost entirely unchanged since DW Griffiths’ Ku Klux Klan-glorifying epic was released. Blockbuster cinema is, and always has been, overwhelmingly male, straight and white.

Take, for example, Star Wars: the noble, aryan, farm-reared Luke Skywalker wouldn’t look particularly out of place on a poster in 1930s Germany. Then there’s Indiana Jones: an Ivy League academic who swans off to the third world, relieves the locals of their artefacts, and packs them away in a museum. Batman is a scion of the plutocracy; Iron Man is a capitalist warmonger. Harry Potter? Private-schooled, old money, born into the “right” sort of family. James Bond? Imperialist sex pest. Avatar? Bow down to your white messiah, blueskins! And so on.

Of course I am being a touch facetious, but the overarching pattern can hardly be denied. Besides, on the rare occasions blockbuster heroes are not white, they tend to be playing for the Caucasian team anyway. Think of Eddie Murphy in the Beverly Hills Cop films: a rough-diamond Detroit native, but when does he become interesting? When he’s summoned to the manicured boulevards of Los Angeles, California: a black man invited to sup with the white elite.

Which brings us rather neatly to the Fast & Furious franchise, which has made $1.6 billion worldwide to date by being emphatically neither elite nor white. These films are about hijacks and lowlifes: daring heists pulled off by loveable crooks with a penchant for customised sports cars and the kind of muscle beach physiques you thought went out in the early 1990s, along with Troll dolls and Communism. Its cast hail from every race under the sun, and are utterly at peace with the series’s roaringly unsubtle bisexual subtext. The films occupy a unique and fascinating position on the contemporary movie landscape: they are at once incredibly important and not all that good.

Watch Full Movie Online Watch a Fast & Furious film and you’ll recognise the aesthetic straight away: not from Hollywood, but the American music industry, where sounds and images from all manner of cultures are smudged together in a spirit of experimentalism that brings to mind a finger-painting toddler. Nicki Minaj, the Trinidadian rapper, marries brawny East Coast hip-hop to sugary Japanese pop music and much more besides, and she has sold five million albums to date. This, too, is the Fast & Furious method. Where else in cinema have the races come together with such unqualified success? Normally the results fall somewhere on a sliding scale of antagonism, from the master-servant dualities of Lawrence of Arabia, to the mutual resentment of Crash, to the thorny one-upmanship of Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song and the blaxploitation boom that followed.

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